Biography of Cal Skinner, Sr. – Part 5 – Switching Parties, Moving to Salt Lake City, Middletown and Crystal Lake

Earlier segments of this biography of my father can be found below on McHenry County Blog.

In 1952, my youngest sister Ellen was born.

That was also the year Dad switched his registration from the Democratic Party to the Republican Party in order to be able to vote for Dwight Eisenhower for president. (Maryland has a closed primary, unlike Illinois’.)

And the state was as Democratic then as it is now.

To understand how Democratic the area was and how significant it was for the President of the Easton Town Council to switch parties, let me tell you about the 1952 Halloween paintings I helped put on the barber shop’s front window.

It was a parade to a haunted house. On a wagon was a sign that said,

Vote Republican

A day or so after we painted it, my 5rh grade teacher, Miss Ornett, suggested that I should change the sign to

Vote

Compliant child that I was, I did.

The Eastern Shore had always been conservative. Today my birth place is firmly in Republican Party control.

But I remember in 1948 when I was six asking my mother why she and Dad weren’t in favor of President Truman. I am not sure of the answer, but that’s the first political thought I remember…unless watching my mother cry when she heard the news that President Roosevelt had died in 1945 when I was two years and ten months counts.

A token of the appreciation of Cal Skinner, Sr.’s Tri-State Packers’ Association employer.

Just as Dad may have been the first to get a student loan, he certainly was one of the first Democratic Party office holders to switch to the Republican Party—all the rage while Ronald Reagan was in office.

My mother, who was the daughter of a Queen Anne County, Maryland, Democratic Party county board member James Clayland Stevens didn’t follow suit until 1954.

Her father was the swing vote who tried to keep the county’s two Democratic Party factions honest after he was recruited by one to run on its slate.

1265 Harrison Avenue

Our first home in Salt Lake City, 1265 Harrison Avenue, a great sledding hill.

In 1953, the family moved to Salt Lake City.
Dad found that he could not get a job at the National Canners Association because the national association did not want to offend its regional affiliate.

So, he looked outside of the food industry.

A chinchilla pelt.

He found the National Chinchilla Breeders and Marketing Associations in Salt Lake City. It had lots of employees, but was looking to modernize and downsize.

Dad did both.

The association keep voluminous records of the genealogy of the little animals with the softest fur on earth.

He implemented a pre-computer filing and sorting system using cards about the size of 4 by 6 inches with places to punch out indicators around all four edges.

Dyed chinchilla never caught on.

That must have meant there needed to be many, many fewer employees, because by the time he moved the office to Middletown, New York, in 1956, the association did not have very many people.

The office was moved because Dad convinced his board that if the industry was going to survive they needed to sell some pelts for coats and stoles.

Since the fur market was in New York City, being fifty miles up the Hudson was close enough to make sales pitches in the city and far enough to avoid the high cost of labor there. The pelt is pretty poor, but the black and gray fur you see above is the natural color. The marketers experimented with dying the pelts blue, among other colors.

After about a year, my father was let go. The board figured his two top assistants earning $5,000 each could do the job he was doing earning $10,000. (My sisterJan covers this much better than I.)

So, Dad was looking for a job while I was a sophomore at Middletown High School. What he found paid less than the NCBA, but it was a job. He was the natural resources man for the National Association of Manufacturers dealing with the big lumber companies, among others.

I suspect he immediately starting looking for a job that paid more and would allow him to see his family more than Wednesday night and weekend. (While Middletown was fifty miles from New York, the same distance as Crystal Lake is from Chicago, the train trip was at least an hour and a half. The track was so bad, the commuters called it the Eire and Lackadaisical.)

Addie Louise Skinner

He stayed in a single room occupancy hotel in NYC, meeting all sorts of interesting people, as he did in Chicago when he preceded us to take his new job as Manager of the Barley and Malt Institute.

“Tell Grandmom—his mother—it’s about malt, like malted milk,” he told me by phone. (You see Addie Watlin-Skinner in her mid-nineties here.)

Addie Skinner was not one who favored alcohol or cards. She and her husband left the Methodist Church about 1944 because it was getting too liberal. My grandfather Skinner built a Holiness Church near Crumpton, Maryland, where they retired.

Dad came to Chicago while us kids finished the school year. He lived in a single room occupancy hotel.

Dad and Mom decided on Crystal Lake as the place they wanted to live. It had a lake that seemed safer than Lake Michigan.

= = = = =
More tomorrow.

Jack Franks “Hubris” – Part 2

Yesterday, we took a look at this Jack Franks’ assertion to the Woodstock Independent after his 58.8% victory over Republican challenger Steve Reick:

“I’m probably the most popular elected official with a ‘D’ at the end of his name in the state of Illinois.”

Today let’s continuing fact checking that claim by just looking at the percentages that Democratic Party State Representatives received in the November election.

Jack Franks is 14th from the bottom.

100% – Daniel J. Burke
100% – Edward J. Acevedo
100% – Luis Arroyo
100% – Cynthia Soto
100% – Esther Golar
100% – Emanuel Chris Welch
100% – La Shawn K. Ford
100% – Arthur Turner
100% – Ann M. Williams
100% – Sara Feigenholtz
100% – Gregory Harris
100% – Lou Lang
100% – Robyn Gabel
100% – Robert Martwick
100% – Silvana Tabares
100% – Michael J. Madigan
100% – Michael J. Zalewski
100% – Elizabeth ‘Lisa’ Hernandez
100% – Barbara Flynn Currie
100% – Monique D. Davis
100% – Robert ‘Bob’ Rita
100% – Thaddeus Jones
100% – William ‘Will’ Davis
100% – Mary E. Flowers
100% – André Thapedi
100% – Marcus C. Evans, Jr.
100% – Kelly M. Burke
100% – Al Riley
100% – Jaime M. Andrade, Jr.
100% – Litesa E. Wallace
100% – Patrick Verschoore
100% – Kathleen Willis
100% – Camille Lilly
100% – Anthony DeLuca
100% – Linda Chapa LaVia
100% – Emily McAsey
100% – Rich Brauer
100% – Jehan Gordon-Booth
100% – Daniel V. Beiser
100% – Eddie Lee Jackson
100% – Jerry Costello II
100% – John Bradley
100%- Brandon W. Phelps

86.9% – Kelly M. Cassidy
85.2% – Pamela Reaves-Harris
83.6% – Christian L. Mitchell
82.7% – Kenneth ‘Ken’ Dunkin

66.8% – Rita Mayfield
66.0% – Frances Ann Hurley
64.8% – Lawrence ‘Larry’ Walsh, Jr.
62.1% – John C. D’Amico
61.3% – Carol Ammons
61.3% – Natalie A. Manley
60.2% – Anna Moeller

Jack Franks

Jack Franks

59.4% – Jay Hoffman
58.6% – Jack D. Franks
58.3% – Laura Fine
57.9% – Stephanie A. Kifowit
56.4% – Elaine Nekritz
54.6% – Fred Crespo
54.3% – Scott Drury
52.4% – Deb Conroy
52.4% – Martin J. Moylan
52.2% – Carol Sente
51.8% – Sam Yingling
51.4% – Michelle Mussman
50.5% – Frank J. Mautino
50.4% – Mike Smiddy
50%+ – Katherine ‘Kate’ Cloonen

$54-$60,000 Earnings in State Government Living in McHenry County

Those who live in McHenry County earning from $54-$60,000 from state government are listed below:

MALISZEWSKI ROBERT STOREKEEPER I DEPT OF HUMAN SVCS $60,174.97
RIVERA CARLOS R ENGINEERING TECH III DEPT OF TRANSPORTATION $59,829.98
KNAKE RAYMOND E EQUIP OPERATOR LABORER STATE TOLL HWY AUTH $59,551.85
WHITE WILLIAM A TOLL COLLECTOR STATE TOLL HWY AUTH $59,324.36
SPIZZINOCO SANDRA J TECH MGR II DEPT OF TRANSPORTATION $59,012.23
BARTMAN JOHN M TECH MGR IV DEPT OF TRANSPORTATION $58,980.00
MCBEAN-DELANEY KELLY SOCIAL SERV PROG PLANNER III DEPT OF HUMAN SVCS $58,955.14
PICKAR CATHERINE E EMPL SECUR SERVICE REP DEPT OF EMPLOY SECUR $58,734.92
KOVALOVSKY PHILIP J EMPL SECUR SERVICE REP DEPT OF EMPLOY SECUR $58,417.80
HOLTZ MICHELLE J TOLL COLLECTOR STATE TOLL HWY AUTH $58,343.43
ANDREWS MARK A TRUCK WEIGHING INSP DEPT OF STATE POLICE $57,747.77
JOHNSON ERIC L SECTION CLERK STATE TOLL HWY AUTH $57,736.42
NICOLAU DANIEL PUBLIC SERVICE REP SECRETARY OF STATE $57,518.00
CARRIGLIO DAVID D TOLL COLLECTOR STATE TOLL HWY AUTH $57,509.88
WELK AMY TECH MGR III DEPT OF TRANSPORTATION $57,352.70
SMITH WENDELL D EMPL SECUR SERVICE REP DEPT OF EMPLOY SECUR $56,743.00
ROBERTSON PATRICIA PUBLIC SERVICE REP SECRETARY OF STATE $56,618.00
MOLLOY KEVIN P PUBLIC SERVICE REP SECRETARY OF STATE $56,618.00
BROCKMAN PAMELA L PUBLIC SERVICE REP SECRETARY OF STATE $56,618.00
LEMKE KAYLIE ANIMAL & ANIMAL PROD INVEST AGRICULTURE $56,200.50
JACOBSEN DEBORAH L TOLL COLLECTOR STATE TOLL HWY AUTH $56,102.32
THOMPSON ROY JEFFRIE LOCK & DAM TENDER NATURAL RESOURCES $55,882.03
COLLINS STACEY A OFFICIAL CT REPORTER IV CT REPORTERS $55,340.28
STECK BRENDA M HUMAN SVCS CASEWORKER DEPT OF HUMAN SVCS $55,329.78
HOLSTEIN-VACEK DEBOR SUPPORT SERVICE WORKER DEPT OF HUMAN SVCS $55,259.06
MARKOS-TSILIMIGRAS E REAL ESTATE INVESTIGATOR DEPT OF FINANC & PROF REG $55,198.98
ALTENBURG ALANA L EMPL SECUR PROG REP DEPT OF EMPLOY SECUR $55,082.73
ROCUSKIE JEAN M SEC THERAPY AIDE I DEPT OF HUMAN SVCS $55,060.53
VARYS MIRIAM C EMPL SECUR PROG REP DEPT OF EMPLOY SECUR $54,731.18
ASPLAND LARRY D CIVIL ENG IV NATURAL RESOURCES $54,717.13
GREENWOOD CATHERINE TOLL COLLECTOR STATE TOLL HWY AUTH $54,617.67
HRYNEWYCZ ANNA M E S TAX AUDITOR I DEPT OF EMPLOY SECUR $54,598.73
MILLER TODD R LOCK & DAM TENDER NATURAL RESOURCES $54,546.57

Chicago Police Department Reticent to Provide Misbehaving Officer’s Photo

Jennifer Martin, who lost her job as a Chicago Police Officer because she ran license plates for a friend.

Jennifer Martin, who lost her job as a Chicago Police Officer because she ran license plates for a friend.

When the neighbor across the way from the castle in Fox River Grove got irritated by people parking on the street, she turned to a neighbor from Boone County’s Candlewick Lake subdivision for help.

The neighbor jotted down the license plate numbers of those visiting the castle.

Then she asked her recreational home’s neighbor, Jennifer Martin, who was on the Chicago Police force to find out who owned the vehicles.

Martin used her access to official records to fulfill the neighbor’s request.

The internal investigations people at the Chicago Police Department opened an investigation on Martin and, as a result, Martin lost her job.

When this news first was reported a couple of months ago, I filed a Freedom of Information request with the Chicago Police Department for a picture of Martin.

The Chicago PD refused to supply it.

The rejection letter from the Chicago Police Department.

The Freedom of Information request to the Chicago Police Department.

Considering the McHenry County Sheriff’s Department had never given me a problem when I asked for deputies’, I found this strange.

I appealed the rejection to the Public Access Bureau of the Illinois Attorney General’s Office.

That resulted in a request for an explanation for the request denial to the Chicago Police Department’s Freedom of Information Officer.

After a while, the picture you see above arrived in an envelope.

As you can see, it was folded in half.

Woodstock attorney Robert Hanlon in the Federal civil case filed against the neighbor by the castle owner.

PRESS RELEASE: PRIM INTRODUCES THREE TOP MANAGERS FOR NEW ADMINISTRATION

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE NOVEMBER 24, 2014
PRIM INTRODUCES THREE TOP MANAGERS FOR NEW ADMINISTRATION

Bill Prim

Bill Prim

With the first day of his administration one week away, McHenry County Sheriff-Elect Bill Prim Monday introduced three highly-experienced managers from widely divergent backgrounds in law enforcement who will form the core of his management team.

“I consider myself extremely fortunate to have recruited some of the finest law enforcement professionals in northern Illinois to help carry out my mission to reform the McHenry County Sheriff’s Office,” Prim said. “They all have compiled tremendous records of service in their different sectors. Together, they should make a superb, high-performance team.”

At the same time, he indicated that he will not name an Undersheriff, but will divide the responsibilities of the Sheriff’s Office into two major divisions, each of which will then report directly to him. “Given the nature of the tasks and the managers’ backgrounds, I believe this approach makes much more sense,” Prim said.

To lead Police operations, Prim turned to former colleague and narcotics task force leader Ricardo Pagán, a veteran of 23 years with the FBI and more than 30 in law enforcement generally, including his entry-level work as a patrol officer and major crimes detective in his native Ohio.

Pagán’s most recent assignment has been as Asst. Special Agent in Charge (ASAC) for the Criminal/Violent Crime Branch of the Chicago FBI, which encompasses 18 different Illinois counties and is comprised of more than 100 special agents, task force officers and their support personnel

Mr. Pagán has also during his FBI career headed up the Intelligence Branch (Chicago), whose 240 members dealt with national security threats as well as organized criminal activity; led a squad of officers from disparate federal and local officers as part of HIDTA (High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area) Task Force; supervised a group of agents who supplied and installed highly sophisticated electronic devices; supervised the training and monitoring of undercover agents; and worked undercover himself.

Prim said he became acquainted with Pagán when they worked together to dismantle large-scale narcotics operations. “Ricardo has deep experience with all the specialized tools of modern law enforcement,” Prim said, “including SWAT teams and hostage negotiation. But he began his career, as I did, as a uniformed officer, so he also has a street-level view of modern policing. I am very excited he will be part of our team.”

Prim’s second pick will be responsible for the jail and general office wide administration. David Devane has a total of 28 years experience in law enforcement, including 24 years with the Cook County Sheriff and four years with that county’s State’s Attorney’s Office.

Devane most recently headed up the policy development function within the Sheriff’s Office, but previously managed Labor Relations and was Executive Director twice (15 years total) of a Department of about 450 employees, over 80% of whom were sworn officers, and for four years was second in command of the Court Services Department, whose then roster of 1,700 deputies were responsible for security of 10 separate courthouses, as well as handling civil process and evictions.

Devane spent most of his Sheriff’s career starting or developing community correctional alternatives, like electronic monitoring, day reporting centers and a community service alternative to incarceration for non-violent offenders. He also developed a residential drug treatment program for 450 inmates. Along the way, he initiated programs like an inmate-staffed garden and greenhouse producing crops both donated to the needy and sold to restaurants like the former Charlie Trotter’s as well as three “sting” operations resulting in the arrests of hundreds of persons with outstanding warrants.

Prior to the Sheriff’s Office, Devane worked in media relations for the U.S. Secretary of Energy in Washington, D.C., and the Illinois Department of Mental Health.

“Dave has been an innovative and flexible administrator for many years and knows the ins and outs of managing a large-scale county law enforcement organization,” Prim said. “He has both built programs and downsized them when necessary. That track record will make him vital to my administration.”
To spearhead the human resources, budget and management operations of the Sheriff’s Office, Prim will name Sandra Fay Salgado, who until recently carried out similar functions in the larger Lake County Sheriff’s Office as their Business Manager.

Ms. Salgado recently vacated her position on the McHenry County Board after 14 years, including service as Chairman of the Human Resources Committee, the Senior Services Grant Commission and the Mental Health Court Task Force.

During her career at Lake County’s Sheriff’s Office, she was responsible for all human resources and financial management operations for their $70 million annual budget, and supervised the accounting, payroll and judicial sales staff.

Ms. Salgado has earned a Masters Degree in Industrial Organizational Psychology, a B.A. in Psychology and has been a certified Human Resources Professional (PHR) since 2007.
“I know that our Sheriff’s Office budget and personnel matters will be in the best possible hands with Ms. Salgado,” Prim said, “and her encyclopedic knowledge of the county and its people will be of great benefit to my Administration.”

Prim said that Devane and Salgado will begin their duties with him on December 1. Pagán will report after the first of the year.

Where Will Rauner Be on the Illiana Tollway?

The following message was written by Woodstock resident Jayson Hemphill. His family’s farm lies in the path of the Illiana Tollway planned across Will County by soon-to-be former Governor Pat Quinn.

During his campaign, winner Bruce Rauner was not heard to say anything about the proposed tollway.

Here’s is Hemphill’s message:

I am writing this letter in strong opposition to the proposed Illiana Expressway.

Illiana Route FEIS Preferred Alternative Map 9-26-14.

Illiana Route FEIS Preferred Alternative Map 9-26-14.

I am also writing as a member of the 6th generation of the descendants of James Hemphill, well documented as one of the first settlers of Will County.

My niece and nephew represent the 7th generation of my family still residing here.

The Geiss family, on my mother’s side, can be traced back to at least 5 generations of local farmers as well.

As I write, I can tell you that I have been raised in an environment that harbors a deep distrust and resentment of governmental authority.

This attitude is as close to being a part of our DNA as it could be.

This sentiment is grounded in 70 plus years of having our farms, property, and homes ravaged by the “needs” of our government.

I put forth to you today, that, the citizens of southern Will County have already given enough.

In 1941, the federal government decided that it needed 40,000 of our acres to support the war effort. As a result of that decision, 450 farms had to be vacated.

Farmers and their families, some of which had already worked this land for three or four generations, were often given only 30 days to leave behind the land that they and their ancestors had quite literally cleared and homesteaded themselves.

I recently heard the story of how a small number of farmers resisted on the day that the United States Army arrived to take possession of their land.

Supposedly, these citizens showed up, pitchfork in hand, to protest and to “fight” for what was rightfully theirs.

As the story goes, the commanding officer addressed these men by saying, and I’m paraphrasing,

“The government needs your land more than you do”, 

and they disbanded, peacefully.

Many of these landowners could never afford to own land again, and were relegated to renting farmland, for the remainder of their careers as farmers.

In my family alone, I know of at least four farms that were absorbed into the arsenal property.

Two of these farms belonged to great-grandparents on both sides of my family.

I am here to tell you, that, to the tune of 40,000 acres and 450 farmsteads, the citizens of southern Will County have already given enough.

Fast forward 40 plus years and we find that politicians from other areas of the state had decided that we need another Chicagoland airport, to be located in the southeastern portion of Will County.

Nearly $100,000,000 of our taxpayer dollars was spent on years of studies and also to purchase over 2,000 acres of our land, beginning about 12 years ago.

Where is the airport?

What is the state of Illinois doing with our land?

That airport was dead on arrival.

These are some of the same bureaucrats that want you to trust them on this Illiana Expressway.

Once again, the citizens of southern Will County have already given enough.

In 1993, when the federal government decided that it no longer needed over half of the 40,000 acres of the arsenal; federal, state, and local politicians began to divide up our land for purposes that were often self-serving.

This land was not being sold back to the residents of southern Will County, but to corporations that would bring us acres and acres of warehouses, union training facilities, and of course, a landfill that can be seen and smelled for miles.

To add insult to injury, we were informed that it had been decided to “set aside” 19,000 acres for a National Tallgrass Prairie. While the need for land conservation is real, so is the need to protect the steadily declining number of acres dedicated to farmland in Illinois.

Do we really need 19,000 acres of tallgrass prairie?

There is one exception in all of this waste….The Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery.

I do believe that residents of any area of the country would be proud to dedicate their land for the purpose of a national cemetery.

The Abraham Lincoln National Cemetery (accounting for merely 1,000 of the 40,000 acres in question) represents the only redeeming use of any of the acreage that southern Will County citizens have given up for their country.

Now, for the past 4 or 5 years the citizens of southern Will County have had to hear about a new threat from the decision makers that rule over our land.

Less than one mile south of the southernmost end of the 40,000 acres that we gave up 70 years ago, they now want to take even more of OUR land to build the Illiana Expressway.

I’m sure that I’m not the only one that sees the irony in displacing MORE of our homes and taking even MORE of our farmland, when less than a mile to the north we have “set-aside” 19,000 acres to grow tallgrass.

That fact alone, screams of the lack of common sense involved in this entire process.

But, I’m really not here to argue the merits of the numbers being touted in favor of this project, or the obvious errors in the geography and logistics.

Any one of us can very easily find fact based figures that refute the claims being made by those in favor of this new state of Illinois pet-project.

I AM here to simply ask on behalf of the citizens of southern Will County, “Haven’t we already given enough?”

Biography of Cal Skinner, Sr. – Part 4 – Sewer Grates, Miles River Yacht Club, Slot Machines, Chesapeake Bay Bridge

This is the fourth in a serialization of my father’s biography. Previous parts can be found below on McHenry County Blog.

One of Dad’s inspirations for running for office involved an unresponsive city government.

Plunk,


plunk,


plunk.

I can hear the sounds of gravel to this day hitting the water below my feet as my Dad held my hands after I managed to slip into the open storm sewer.

Dad went to city hall and asked for a grate on the sewer. (You might say my and my father’s political careers started that day…in the gutter. That what I said about my own when I announced for the U.S. Senate in 1981 at my then in-laws’ Herb and Millicent Geist’s David Adler mansion at at 955 Lake Avenue in Lake Forest.)

Dad didn’t get what he requested.

So, when the post of president of the town council became vacant, he had a real reason for running.

Needless to say, storm sewers soon through Easton soon had grates.

Jan Skinner with parents Cal and Eleanor Skinner in 1965, the year they went to Europe.

First daughter Janet was born in 1944.

I remember the family joined the Miles River Yacht Club. We had a small outboard in what seemed to be a very big berth to someone about six. I remember the day we came to the yacht club and it had sunk.

More scary were the fireworks that blew onto our blanket when the wind blew in from the east during the 4th of July celebration.

Dad then bought a leaky, old fishing boat. We had just seen the “African Queen,” so it probably was in 1951 or 52. The boat ran aground in Kent Narrows and the men got off to push it off the sandbar. I was put in charge of the pump at age ten, while my eight-year old sister Janet sat with me inside the small cabin.

The yacht club is where I got introduced to slot machines. They were nickel slots and I have to admit I did not understand the sign above them:

No Minors
Allowed

I knew there were no mines nearby.

My father and his assistant Jack Rue, who became a congressional assistant to either Rogers C.B. Morton or his successor, took off the boat’s copper sheathing and spend hours putting wooden match sticks into the holes where the nails had been.

One day a snow goose showed up in the back room where the washing machine was kept. Dad had shot it. I remember Mother’s pouring boiling water over to loosen the feathers, which she plucked. I don’t think she was too happy about having that task.

Sometime in the late 1940’s Dad bought a used offset press and started a printing business in the side room where we played. I guess he thought the family needed more money than Tri-State Packers paid him.

Dad was in the caravan of Eastern Shore public officials who were the first to drive across the new Chesapeake Bay Bridge in 1952.

So much for the ferry rides across the Bay. They were a real treat to us kids.

That was the same year that second daughter Ellen entered the world. Jan and I were asked if we wanted a little brother or sister. My guess is that Mom asked the question after she was pregnant.

= = = = =
More tomorrow

Jack Franks’ Hubris – Part 1

Jack Franks was hustling in the Johnsburg

Jack Franks was hustling at the Johnsburg parade.

“Hubris” is “excessive pride or self-confidence.”

Synonyms include arrogance, conceit, haughtiness, hauteur, pride, self-importance, egotism, pomposity, superciliousness, superiority

The antonyms is humility.

In Greek tragedy hubris is excessive pride toward or defiance of the gods, which leads to downfall.

“I’m probably the most popular elected official with a ‘D’ at the end of his name in the state of Illinois,”

said Jack Franks to the Woodstock Independent for its post-election article of November 12th.

Let’s fact check that claim.

Franks won his fall re-election campaign over Republican Steve Reick, getting about 58.6% of the vote.

Franks vote tally all wo late ab

These are almost final results in the fall election for the 63rd District State Representative contest show Jack Franks with 58.58% of the ballots.

Four years ago he received 63.92% of the vote against John O’Neill.

So, if Franks is the “most popular elected official with a ‘D’ at the end of his name,” his popularity has decreased from four years ago.

Illinois Secretary of State Jesse White received

Illinois Secretary of State Jesse White received 65.6% of the vote.

Let’s look at what other candidates for State Representative with a “D” after their name did this time around.

Starting in Cook County, First District Representative Dan Burke had no opponent and received 11,299 votes.

Second District State Rep. Eddie Acevedo had no opponent and received 11,861 ballots.

District 3 State Rep. Luis Arroyo had no opponent and got 11.614.

Madiga, Lilsa vote totals almost final 2014

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan’s vote margin fell to 59%-38%-3%.

District 4 State Rep. Cynthia Soto also had no opponent and received support from 14,986 voters.

District 5 incumbent State Rep. Kenneth ”Ken” Dunkin had an opponent named Collin Johnson. The incumbent won 22,016 ballots or 82.69% of the vote.

District 5 Democrat Esther Golar, a Democrat, received 18,865. Note that is more votes than Franks received.

Eighth District Democrat La Shawn K. Ford got 14.824 votes.

District 9 State Rep. Arthur Turner won 20,409 votes. He was unopposed. Note that is more votes than Franks received.

In District 10, Democrat Pamela Reaves-Harris beat out opponent Mark Calonder by 20,683 to 35,86. Reaves-Harris not only got more votes than Franks, but her percentage of the vote–85.22%–was 27 percentage points higher.

In District 11, State Rep. Ann M. Williams received 22,078 votes, again more than Jack Franks.

In District 12, Sara Feigenholtz’ 25,008 votes belies Franks’ claim to be “the most popular elected official with a ‘D’ at the end of his name.” (Maybe Feigenholtz doesn’t count because she is not a guy.)

District 13’s Democratic Party candidate Gregory Harris received 22,244 votes, again more than Franks got.

There was a contest in District 14. Democrat Kelly M. Cassidy got 22,202 over Denis Detzel or 86.85% of the vote, almost thirty percentage points better than Jack Franks.

In District 15 there was a contest between Democrat John C. D’Amico and Gregory A. Bedell. The Democrat got 9,425 ballots for 69.20%, beating Bedell’s 4,194 votes. D’Amico’s margin was a bit more than ten percentage points more than Jack Franks beat Steve Reick.

You get the point.

There are a lot of Democrats who received a higher percentage of the vote than Jack Franks.
= = = = =

Tomorrow, I’ll look for Democrats who got a lower winning percentage than Jack Franks’ 58.8%.

McHenry County Residents Earning $60-$66,000 from State Government

$60-$66,000 salaries are paid to these McHenry County residents.  State Rep. Barb Wheeler is listed here.  She is lower than the other legislators because she is not paid a bonus for being a minority spokesman on one of the committees that House Speaker Mike Madigan has created to keep members busy while he is making the real decisions.

WHITE MICHAEL C AUTOMOTIVE MECHANIC DEPT OF CENTRAL MGMT SVCS $66,423.78
PLAUCK ANDREW T NATURAL RESOURCES SPECIAL NATURAL RESOURCES $66,200.15
DICKEY DALE W STRUCTUAL STATE TOLL HWY AUTH $66,080.20
ARREOLA RAFAEL HUMAN SVCS CASEWORKER DEPT OF HUMAN SVCS $66,076.52
NULLE-HOXIE RUTH E EXECUTIVE II SECRETARY OF STATE $65,855.50
LYONS ANDREA LYNN CHILD PROTECT ADV SPEC CHILDREN & FAMILY SVCS $65,796.30
GILETTA WALTER J EDUCATIONAL DIAGNOSTICIAN DEPT OF JUVENILE JUSTICE $65,632.73
KENNEDY COLETTE LYNN BUREAU CHIEF ATTY GENERAL $65,569.50
COIT LYNN CHILD PROTECT SPEC CHILDREN & FAMILY SVCS $65,444.39
GIERKE ELIZABETH HUMAN SVCS CASEWORKER DEPT OF HUMAN SVCS $65,256.13
PEAVY FRED C TECH MGR III DEPT OF TRANSPORTATION $65,188.52
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MAKI DONNA JO ASSIST ATTY GENERAL II ATTY GENERAL $64,758.78
WHEELER BARBARA M STATE REP STATE OFCRS $64,717.08
LEE DENISE A TELECOMUNICATOR SPECIAL DEPT OF STATE POLICE $64,023.11
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GRISWOLD KAREN A EDUCATOR DEPT OF JUVENILE JUSTICE $63,766.51
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JENSEN TIMMY R TOLL COLLECTOR STATE TOLL HWY AUTH $62,400.49
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RIDGE REED C DRIVERS LICENSE HEARING OFCR SECRETARY OF STATE $60,858.50
LOPEZ MONICA HUMAN SVCS CASEWORKER DEPT OF HUMAN SVCS $60,215.16

Was Harrison Really Running for State’s Attorney?

Jim Harrison

Jim Harrison

There seemed to be three significant parts of Jim Harrison’s campaign for McHenry County Sheriff.

The first two were guilt by association articles on the front page of the Northwest Herald.

I think it is fair to say that without this unpaid campaigning by the NWH, Harrison would not have had much of a campaign.

The third element were his signs.

Their color scheme, black on bright yellow mirrored my own. I figured Republican opponent Bill Prim had to put up at least three signs to counteract the impact of each of Harrison’s.

Maybe I should add letters to the NWH as a fourth element of Harrison’s campaign.  That cost nothing either.

Summarizing, there wasn’t much to Harrison’s campaign.

No mailing.

No door-to-door literature distribution.

No newspaper advertising.

A bit of radio advertising.

So, why did he run?

Perhaps the next iteration of this big sign will indicate that it was paid for by the Harrison campaign.

Perhaps the next iteration of this big sign will indicate that it was paid for by the Harrison campaign.

It’s not a real big secret that folks at the NWH would rather not have Lou Bianchi in office.

If you doubt their slant, please refer back to the paper’s coverage of Bianchi’s indictments.

There was a more recent clue to the paper’s disapproval of the current State’s Attorney in a recent Saturday “Thumbs up, thumbs down” editorial. Bianchi got a “thumbs down.” The reason escapes me.

So, I am wondering if the reason Harrison ran for Sheriff was because he intends to run for McHenry County State’s Attorney.

That he isn’t finished with elective politics, even after barely topping the 39% mark, was signaled on his Facebook this past week.

He asked that the four by four foot signs be returned to his headquarters.

Those signs and his three versions of yard signs brought him name identification.

Whether it was positive or not, only polling would tell.

If Bianchi decides to run for re-election, the odds are really high that Harrison would not run in the Republican Primary.

Given how gathering enough signatures to get on the ballot as an Independent ate up money and volunteer time, I would guess that would not be his route either.

That leaves the Democratic Party.  To gain its Primary Election nomination requires relative few signatures are needed.

And, in a Presidential year, there would be more Democrats voting than did this year.