County Union Negotiators $73,000 Over Budget

The County Board will vote upon paying union negotiation fees that went way over budget at Tuesday’s meeting.

Here’s the explanation:

The fiscal year 2015 Human Resources Departmental Budget contained $109,000 for Legal Services to be incurred with labor negotiations.

This year the County has been in negotiations with

  • Local 150 – Highway Maintenance
  • SEIU – Coroner
  • SEIU – Animal Control
  • FOP 1 – Sheriff Patrol
  • FOP II – Corrections
  • FOP III – Civilians
  • MAP – Circuit Clerk
  • SEIU – Valley Hi

causing a huge drain on the legal services budget.

Negotiations with SEIU Coroner and Animal Control have not gone well, placing more strain on the budget.

The Legal Service budget line item in the Human Resources FY2015 budget has now been depleted and is in a deficit of $73,350.73, which is eating into other budget line items within the department.

The Finance and Audit Committee can authorize up to $20,000 of expense in contingency prior to requiring Board approval, and gave permission to utilize $18,440.50 of the contingency budget to cover the September Invoices.

The October invoices total $28,099.75 with November invoices estimated at $21,329.00.

County Administration and the Human Resources Director are now seeking approval to expend an additional $49,428.75 from the FY2015 General Fund Contingency budget to allow for payment on these outstanding invoices.


Comments

County Union Negotiators $73,000 Over Budget — 19 Comments

  1. Hey Joe; who’s being overpaid?

    Which workers exactly?

    The sheriff’s deputies, the street crews, the court security, the coroner, clerks, secretaries, who exactly?

    Blanket statements like yours lack credibility AND back-up facts.

  2. People are fleeeing this county because of the high taxes and you are comfortable with paying even more?

    In the private sector people are barely getting any raises but they are the ones that have to pay public sector workers who get higher than inflation COLAs every single year.

    Comparing prevailing wages to the BLS’s median incomes for those wages illustrated that, yes, people are overpaid.

    No, the Sheriff and the Coroner don’t need 100 thousand dollar salaries — and they certainly don’t need raises.

    Enough is enough.

  3. Joe; get the facts as to WHO is asking for raises before you point fingers.

  4. I am speaking in generalities.

    People are fed up with public sector workers always asking for more.

    They reject deals that people in the private sector would love to have and insist on more.

    I’m pointing fingers at all of them.

    Live within your means.

    We give benefits to part time workers for crying out loud.

    The fact that taxpayers just overpaid 73,000 for people to negotiate how much more money taxpayers have to pay other government employees, while folks and businesses are leaving and wages are barely budging is outrageous and absurd.

    Go find out how real people in this county live.

    Learn some humility and take what they’re offering, because that’s still more than what regular people in the county are getting.

  5. Joe you clearly have no clue what you are talking about.

    The majority of government employees make far less than private sector employees and their raises are crap.

  6. Want to know who is overpaid at the County? Want names?

    https://www.co.mchenry.il.us/home/showdocument?id=36861

    Not many names in this listing could be classified as ‘underpaid’.

    In addition, if you live in Algonquin Township, imho Anna May Miller is overpaid.

    She rakes in $21,000 from the County plus $87,281.12 from Algonquin Township – not bad for a secretarial position working for a Township Road District.

    Based on another post in this blog, her attendance at the County may be indicative that she has too much to do:

    She misses every fifth meeting.

    http://mchenrycountyblog.com/2015/12/04/schuster-gottemoller-barnes-lead-in-county-board-attendance/

    Voters in Algonquin may want to consider retiring her from her County job.

    If you live in Harvard, school district 50, the D-50 School Board elected secretary (unpaid position) is Richard Crosby. Richard is married to Jacklyn Crosby.

    Between the two of them they are paid $244,837.30 per year in pensions.

    Richard was a superintendent in Harvard and Jacklyn was a superintendent in Cary.

    http://www.openthebooks.com/search/?PensionCode=23

    The Illinois Constitution guarantees them a 3 PERCENT annual annual increase.

    An increase which is being paid by people who have lost one third of the value of their real estate.

    If AZsupporter wants some more names, I suggest he / she spend some time on the Open the Books web site.

  7. This article asserts that public sector workers are paid slightly lower salary than private sector.

    However the average benefit package raises total public compensation to about 40% more than private sector.

    Public employees’ health insurance compensation is said to be half again as much, and annual retirement income benefits are more than triple.

    This makes intuitive sense.

    Go to any online annuity calculator, and discover how much it costs to purchase a lifetime annuity with cola and survivor rights, per each estimated amount of desired annual income.

    Then go to any online retirement savings calculator, to discover how much needs to be saved annually in order to accumulate enough to purchase that annuity.

    http://www.rebootillinois.com/2015/06/14/editors-picks/kevin-hoffmanrebootillinois-com/americans-for-prosperity-study-illinois-public-workers-benefits-make-them-better-paid-than-private-sector-counterparts/39447/

  8. My parents always told me not to live beyond my means.

    If you can’t afford it, don’t buy it, or live there.

    As a public service employee make the county run for everybody, i.e.road crews, mechanics, police, court security, clerks, they have to make a living as well as you do.

    For the most part, county employees make an average salary slightly lower than the public sector, and they all pay a percentage into their own retirement package and health package.

    The fact that a pension plan of some sort is in place is a state statute, I believe based upon the number of people in the area (I know that works like that for City police-ask someone from Sunnyside/Johnsburg when they merged and had to start a pension).

    With all the hub-bub about fast food workers wanting a $15.00@hr living wage from a part-time unskilled-labor job at McDonald’s, understanding the salary structure of a county government shouldn’t be that hard.

    Joe is complaining about the managerial job positions getting big salaries, based on job title and experience, which MAY have some substance, but not very much.

  9. There are many problems with the current public sector collective bargaining process in Illinois.

    Each negotiated agreement and negotiaton is unique but in general:

    1. The union negotiators often provide negotiation updates to the rank and file, but the employer negotiators rarely provide negotiation updates to the taxpayer, under the guise negotiations should be kept private and negotiation should not be done in public. If the rank and file receive negotiation updates, the taxpayer should also receive negotiation updates.

    2. Tentati

  10. 2. Tentative agreenents are subject to approval by the rank and file. If the agreement is subject to rank and file approval, it should also be subject to taxpayer approval.

    3. The change document should be made public prior to taxpayer vote, and certainly after the agreement has been approved.

    The change document highlights changes from the current agreement to the new agreement. Typically underlined text is used for additions and striken through text for deletions.

    4. The lifetime pensionable and non pensionable salary/income history of all public sector employees should be made public. The public pays the salary/income. Then the public can decide for themselves if pay hikes are warranted.

    There is much more but there are 4 suggested Illinois public sector collective bargaining reforms.

  11. Supporters of public sector defined benefit plans speak in generalities.

    It is quite simple to determine the present value of an annuity roughly equivalent to the defined-benefit pension of such employees.

    Also simple is to find the small percentage which public employees have contributed to the amount of that ‘annuity equivalent’ (which private workers would have had to save on their own or in some combination of matching contributions by employers).

    Commenter Mark has posted all the numbers, more than once.
    Scrutiny of actual specific numbers renders the supporters’ general arguments invalid.

    Because public workers receive so much more income by virtue of defined benefit plans and overpriced health insurance, and the gap continues to grow, the only solution seems to hire FEWER such high priced workers:

    Reduce government, or privatize.

  12. McHenry County still does not post current and past copies of collective bargaining agreements on its website?

    For taxpayer transparency and accountability reasons hey should be posted in one place.

    For most government bodies that is in the human resources section.

    Some government bodies post the agreements under the Board section or Business Office or Administration section.

    Sometimes they appear in board minutes or agendas but that makes it far too difficult to locate the agreements.

    All elected officials should ensure these documents are posted on the government website.

    The entire agreement should be posted, including cover page and appendixes, in searchable (not an image) format.

    Along with any changes to the agreements, such as memorandums of understanding, letters of agreement, side letters, riders, addendums, etc.

    School districts are mandated by state law to postcollective bargaining agreements on their website.

    Other government entities are not required by state law to post collective bargaining agreements on their website.

    The agreements should be easy to locate and identify on the government website, and that is not the case with McHenry County.

    All these board members, all these years, and no one can make this happen?

  13. One of the primary tasks of a taxpayer watchdog is to ensure a history of complete searcable collective bargaing agreements is posted on the government website in an easy to find location and readily appears when doing a search on the government website.

    As amazing as it seems, apparently there is no watchdog for McHenry County.

    You cannot do everything to monitor government, but you can do something.

    Pick a government body and be sure they are posting any collective bargaining agreements, using the above guidelines.

    Ask your state legislators to sponsor legislation reguiring all governments to post collective bargaining agreements, using the above guidelines.

    Just posting the current agreement is not good enough.

    1. It should be searchable (not an image format).

    2. It should be easy to locate on the website…an easy clear path in an obvious location.

    3. It should be easy to find via the search feature on the government website.

    4. The cover page should be included.

    5. All appendixes should be included.

    6. All subsequent changes should be includex, such as memorandums of understanding, letters of agreement, addendums, and any other add-ons o changes.

    7. A complete history of the agreements should be included, not just the current version.

    8. The change document should be included for each agreement, for example, underline text for additions and stricken through text for deletions.

    The lack of the above is a reason we are in our current financial mess.

    There is little understanding of what has transpired over the years.

    There has to be good taxpayer transparency of the negotiated agreements between politicians and organized labor.

    It has been too easy for politicians to provide enhancements which too often results in votes and support in exchange.

    There are thousands of these collective bargaining agreements at the local, county, state, and Federal levels.

    Just pick one to watchdog.

    And somehow network with others for support.

    The Better Government Association has many local collective bargaining agreements on its website, but not county.

    The taxpayers are not organized.

  14. Just one more (as if anyone needed any more) reason to abandon
    Illinois ASAP, as tens of thousands already have and will continue to do.

    Lincoln is sobbing from his grave for what has become of this once great state.

  15. Here is an acronym chart for the above labor unions.

    Local 150 = International Union of Operating Engineers Local 150 = IUOE Local 150.

    SEIU = Service Employees International Union
    R
    FOP = Fraternal Order of Police

    MAP = Metropolitan Alliance of Police

  16. I don’t regularly look at the Federal Court Clerk’s web site.

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