GOP Precinct Committeemen Collect Candidate Literature

With temperatures predicted to be closer to 50 degrees than zero next weekend and early voting having begun, people in precincts where Republican Committeemen actually go door-to-door might find someone knocking on their doors next weekend.

Candidates taped their signs to the windows. There's even one for Precinct Committeeman candidate

Candidates taped their signs to the windows. There’s even one for Algonquin Township Precinct Committeeman candidate John Bobbytzke of Cary.

This past weekend, they were picking up candidate pamphlets at the new headquarters right next to Joseph’s Market in the Crystal Lake Plaza.

As I entered shortly after eleven on Saturday, here's what was happening.

As I entered shortly after eleven on Saturday, here’s what was happening.  GOP Central Committee Diane Evertsen (front left–the only time that word will be used to describe her) presumably had the key.  She is talking with Judicial candidate Demetri Tsilimigras

Sitting around the table at the front were Demetri Tsilimigras, running for Circuit Court Judge, Recorder of Deeds candidate Tina Hill and Nunda Township Republican Central Committee Chairman Mike Shorten.

Checking off the precincts for which literature was collected was Recorder of Deeds Candidate Tina Hill. Chatting with her were Demetri Tsilimigras and Mike Shorten.

Checking off the precincts for which literature was collected was Recorder of Deeds Candidate Tina Hill. Chatting with her were Demetri Tsilimigras and Mike Shorten.

State Senate candidate Casey Urlacher came with supporters and literature.

State Senate Casey Urlacher is seen with supporter David Miller, Precinct Committeeman in Algonquin Township Precinct 17.

State Senate Casey Urlacher is seen with supporter David Miller, Precinct Committeeman in Algonquin Township Precinct 17.

Here’s a view from the two-thirds back in the room.

About two-thirds back in the room you can see Judge James Cowlin on the left.

About two-thirds back in the room you can see Judge James Cowlin on the left and his opponent Demetri Tsilimigras on the right.  State Rep. candidate Dan Wilbrandt can be seen near the chairs.

A number of the Committeemen didn’t leave immediately after getting their campaign materials.

McHenry County Board candidate Tom Wilbeck, Rand Ford candidate Michael Symk and McHenry County College board member chatted.

McHenry County Board candidate Tom Wilbeck, Rand Ford candidate Michael Symk and McHenry County College board member chatted.

Congressman Peter Roskam’s opponent, Dr. Jay Kinzler brought more literature.

Dr. Jay Kinzler brought more literature for his 6th congressional district challenge to Peter Roskam.

Dr. Jay Kinzler brought more literature for his 6th congressional district challenge to Peter Roskam.

The folks tended to group with those they were supporting.

In this photo can be seen County GOP Treasurer Chuck Wheeler,

In this photo can be seen County GOP Treasurer Chuck Wheeler (in the Blackhawks jersey), McHenry Alderman Andy Glab (the tall one), McHenry Township GOP Chairman Steve Rooney (striding toward the window) and McHenry County Board member and candidate for Recorder of Deeds Tina Hill (on the phone).

Another group consisting of McHenry County State’s Attorney candidate Patrick Kenneally, McHenry County Board and County GOP Vice Chairman Andrew Gasser and Wonder Lake Committeeman Rachel Smith were talking.

Patrick Kenneally, Andrew Gasser and Rachel Smith chatted.

Patrick Kenneally, Andrew Gasser and Rachel Smith chatted.

Marengo Library District Board member and Precinct Committeeman Cynthia Allen Schenk was being courted by three candidates: Patrick Kenneally,

From left to right, Judicial candidate Demetri Tsilimigras, Committeeman Cynthia Allen Schenk, State Rep. candidate Dan Wilbrandt and State's Attorney candidate Patrick Kenneally.

From left to right, Judicial candidate Demetri Tsilimigras, Committeeman Cynthia Allen Schenk, State Rep. candidate Dan Wilbrandt and State’s Attorney candidate Patrick Kenneally.

Schenk gathered signs for Ersel Schuster and Kelly Liebmann.

More conversation among Republican activists.

More conversation among Republican activists.  From left to right, Recorder of Deeds candidate Joe Tirio, Judicial candidate Demetri Tsilimigras, Marengo Township Committeeman Cynthia Allen Schenk and State Rep. candidate Dan Wilbrandt.

The room was cool, so a couple of those who stayed a long time warmed their hands over a heater.

Warming hands over a space heater were County Board Chairman Mike Walkup and Judicial candidate Demetri Tsilimigras.  On the left is McHenry Township GOP Chairman Steve Rooney,  Judge James Cowlin can be seen behind Walkup with his daughter, who stayed the whole time.

Warming hands over a space heater were County Board Chairman Mike Walkup and Judicial candidate Demetri Tsilimigras. On the left is McHenry Township GOP Chairman Steve Rooney, Judge James Cowlin can be seen behind Walkup with his daughter, who stayed the whole time.


Comments

GOP Precinct Committeemen Collect Candidate Literature — 19 Comments

  1. It would appear the mink coat was not given up during the bankruptcy?

  2. Can’t be too committed to only knock on doors when the temps rise.

    Go Bernie.

  3. Well if you come out to Marengo you will find I have been knocking on doors during the frigid temps..

    But we cannot get signs in the ground when it’s too cold..and I have spent considerable time remounting those signs I have already put up..

    90 percent of the people I connect with are thrilled that I am making the effort to reach out to them.

  4. The fur coat and her jewelry were properly disclosed on her bankruptcy petition and claimed as exempt.

    The petition is public record if you doubt me.

    Her creditors and bankruptcy trustee had full notice of the existence of these items, and the bankruptcy trustee declined to pursue them.

    There is no doubt in my mind that everything was above board about the mink because fur coats are easy for a bankruptcy trustee to convert to cash for the benefit of an estate.

    If the trustee (who is an expert at reviewing bankruptcy petitions and determining if there is money to squeeze out) didn’t balk at her keeping the coat, I can ensure you that she was entitled to keep the coat.

    Bankrupt debtors can exempt $4,000 of value of any items of property (even if it were $4,000 in cash).

    The bankruptcy system is not so cruel to require debtors to part with all of their possessions and put them out on the street.

    The fact that Tina readily identifies this coat as coming from her mother tells me that it has significant sentimental value to her.

    While I’m all for kicking people when they’re down, give her a break.

    She was raked over the coals extensively for the bankruptcy filing at the time.

    Pray that you never have such a hard time in your life that you have to file.

  5. Boethius: Why do you protest so much?

    I was just asking.

    I was quite happy with Cal’s response.

  6. I’m not protesting. I just want to nip in the bud the rampant and uninformed rumors that start flying in the comment section of this blog.

    Once someone insinuated that it was improper for her to keep her fur coat following the bankruptcy, some other schmuck was likely to come along and suggest bankruptcy fraud, and then another schmuck would come along and suggest a letter writing campaign to the US Trustee in Rockford, etc.

    I’m just trying to save all of you the embarrassment by telling you that from a legal standpoint everything is legally proper about her having a fur coat on her back vis a vis her bankruptcy filing.

    I’m no Tina Hill fan.

    In fact, I’m a fan of none of the candidates in the Recorder’s race.

    But, I can’t sit by idly while the lynch mob rumor machine ramps up.

  7. Boethius: Re: “telling you that from a legal standpoint everything is legally proper”

    When Mr. Zinke made his phone call to warn of a pending drug raid it was legal.

    When Mrs. Miller used the county seal on a campaign letter, it was legal.

    With all the personal knowledge you have relative to the Hill bankruptcy and the tone expressed in the posts, I wonder are you a family member?

    Her attorney?

    I simply asked a question, Cal answered it and now you are on a ‘tear’.

    Why?

  8. I have no relationship with Tina.

    I arrived at my opinion by reviewing her publicly record bankruptcy petition (you can, too, with about $5 on a credit card at pacer.gov).

    I wouldn’t consider this to be a “tear,” but I’m responding to your question because it was a loaded question.

    Asking “It would appear the mink coat was not given up during the bankruptcy?” implies that it should have been given up in the bankruptcy.

    That’s similar to asking “When did you stop beating your wife?,” which implies that you’re a wife beater.

    Don’t ask loaded questions if you don’t want people to set you straight about the assumptions underlying your question.

  9. And also, while you were “quite happy with Cal’s response,” Cal’s response didn’t answer the question.

    Just because you inherit something doesn’t mean that you won’t have to cough it over in a bankruptcy.

    The actual reason why Tina didn’t turn over the mink in her bankruptcy is because she claimed it as exempt under the law, and irrespective of whether the exemption was properly claimed, no one challenged her exemption in the time frame provided by law.

    Again, you’re just asking loaded questions, and I’m just answering with facts.

  10. Every candidate and their supporters who are out in the frigid temperatures should be applauded.

    We were out all day on Saturday with hand warmer packets in our gloves and pens that were too frozen to write on our clipboards.

    Campaigning is hard work, and these candidates/supporters truly show how much they care when they’re out in this weather!

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