Huntley School District Reports Declining Enrollment Leading to Fewer Teachers

From Huntley Unit School District 158 Superintend Scott Rowe:

Huntley 158 Enrollment Trends and Impact on Future Staffing

Huntley 158 community,

We want to provide you with information about ongoing enrollment trends in our district and the impacts that these trends will have on our staff and schools.

Our community has been fortunate to experience tremendous growth over the past 20+ years.

We have benefited from the population and housing boom of the 2000s that transformed our area from a rural community into a thriving suburb.

Along with that growth came an influx of young families, and our District has experienced huge enrollment growth over that time.

Now, the population boom has begun to slow, and our community has begun to mature.

With these trends comes declining school enrollment.

Over the past few years, we have seen enrollment decline, reflected primarily in smaller numbers of kindergarten students entering the District.

Since the 2015-2016 school year, the District’s total enrollment has decreased from 9,631 to the current enrollment of 9,203.

Even as enrollment has decreased, the District has found ways to create new programs, add support in our buildings with existing staff, and absorb positions as teachers leave the District.

By filling many of these positions internally, the District has been able to avoid making reductions in our teaching staff and maintain a standard of excellence in educational achievement and innovation.

As we prepare for the 2020-2021 school year, it has become evident that a reduction in our teaching staff will need to occur.

Based on the enrollment trend at Marlowe Middle School, it will be necessary to reduce one team at each grade level at that school.

Marlowe Middle School

In addition, as enrollment in our early grades continues to decline, it will be necessary to reduce the number of teachers at the elementary level as well.

These reductions will impact many different buildings, based primarily on the subject areas staff members are licensed to teach, their performance evaluations, and their seniority in the District.

At this time, an exact number of reductions is still being determined.

As teachers choose to retire, pursue opportunities outside our District, or request leaves of absence, those positions will be evaluated.

If a position becomes available due to one of these reasons, and is able to be filled internally, the total number of reductions may decrease.

The District will continue to communicate with our staff and community members about the impacts of these moves.

These kinds of decisions are agonizing but necessary. We remain committed to the staff members who have chosen to serve our learning community so well over the years.

In this spirit we will make every effort to help teachers affected by reductions find employment in neighboring districts and support them through the interviewing process.

Thank you for your understanding and support as we move forward with this difficult process.

= = = = =

2015 MCC Expansion plan.

It appears that Steve Willson was correct when he used the prospect of fewer potential McHenry County College students to argue against massive expansion.


Comments

Huntley School District Reports Declining Enrollment Leading to Fewer Teachers — 9 Comments

  1. Cal, D-155 and the feeder districts just received their most recent enrollment study.

    D-155 reviewed it at their last board meeting, but there are no documents listed on the D-155 site for the report, nor does the district post the meeting videos to youtube anymore.

    You would have to FOIA the Kasarda study from the districts you may be interested in.

    I do know that the D-26 portion of that study are listed on their web site for tomorrow’s finance committee meeting as its a central factor in developing the next year’s staffing plan.

  2. No story brings greater joy to compassionate conservative republikkklans than reading about “less teachers.” This sunshine blog and sunshine commenters rejoice with the idea of less education due to less teachers and less people, with the hope of going back to the glorious days of old fashioned rural McHenry County with a total population not exceeding 65 people. Stay tuned…tic, tock, tic, tock, 259 days, tic, tock, tic, tock, meeeeeeoooooooowwwwwwwwwwwwww…

  3. 2018 Huntley District 158 OEPP: $10,570

    2018 Woodstock D200 OEPP: $13,994

    Woodstock D200 spends 33% more per pupil per year than Huntley.

    2018 Huntley District 158 p-tax rate 5.7% of EAV

    2018 Woodstock D200 p-tax rate 7.6% of EAV

    Woodstock D200 takes .63 of a percent more of total home value in taxes than Huntley: that is $1260 more per year on a $200,000 home.

    How do we get our property detached-and-annexed out of Woodstock D200 and into Huntley 158?

  4. Sounds like Huntley could use more illegal Mexicans children.

  5. Enrollment in D158 is down to 9203 from 9631, yet the Superintendent states:

    “By filling many of these positions internally, the District has been able to avoid making reductions in our teaching staff and maintain a standard of excellence in educational achievement and innovation.”

    See how different the government (public schools) is from the private sector.

    A loss of sales and customers in the private sector most usually means a reduction in staff.

    But, in government, public schools, not so.

  6. It’s funny how Angel insults old rural McHenry County when the education system he works for is based off of Prussia’s.

    If you were born in the 1800’s, I bet you have fond memories of Prussia, that nation that hasn’t existed in over 100 years…

  7. “See how different the government (public schools) is from the private sector.

    A loss of sales and customers in the private sector most usually means a reduction in staff.

    But, in government, public schools, not so.”

    bred – im sorry you are so confused by this, but here is a simple explanation that you can contemplate for awhile:

    that is because in the PRIVATE sector the ultimate goal is MONETARY PROFIT.

    WHEREAS

    in schools the ultimate goal is the GROWTH OF A HUMAN MIND.
    ______

    To argue that the two should be run the same way is dense; unfortunately that may be an adjective that you are familiar with.

  8. If that were true, rino, you could produce evidence to support it.

    In Woodstock CUSD 200 the performance metrics do not support your assertion.

    Spending 33% more per student annually than neighboring school district has not measurably ‘grown human minds’ by standardized test results.

    In Woodstock IL, more than 10% of income from median households living in median value homes is taken for property taxes.

    In America the mean percentage of household income spent on property taxes is 3.4%.

    Taxing 6.6% MORE of household budget has a meangful effect.

    It steals a family’s ability to keep a beloved pet, or save for children’s college education.

    National peer analytics of public education at Woodstock CUSD support the assertion that their education provision is deeply mediocre.

    Woodstock schools and government are Taxing 300% of what communities all across America charge for the same public services.

    This policy of enrichment of a few insiders at extreme cost to every member of the community (including children) is how the Illinois political industry practices government.

    That is a diminution of the human mind.

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