Message of the Day – Train Tracks

From the Illinois Holocaust Museum comes this soul-wrenching photo:

Train tracks to Auschwitz.

Comments

Message of the Day – Train Tracks — 10 Comments

  1. New sign on tollways when entering Illinois:

    Welcome To Illinois – “Arbeit Macht Frei”

  2. Franklin Delano Roosevelt(D) knew of this place and could’ve bombed that photo’s building and the tracks leading to it into oblivion.

    He chose to do nothing.

    Same guy(D) that sent boats away from the US of Jews trying to Escape that place, and same guy(D) who interned Japanese Americans.

    “At the opening of the US Holocaust Museum in 1993, President Clinton(D) pointed out that under the Roosevelt(D) administration, “doors to liberty were shut and…rail lines to the camps within miles of militarily significant targets were left undisturbed.”

  3. Next 4 years of oppression from the Cheaters in office taking us down this highway to hell …

  4. More agitprop!

    Keep it up. The effectiveness declines w/ hypersaturation.

  5. There have been studies which have shown that FDR’s government actions during the Great Depression of the 1930’s actually prolonged the depression by many years. An 20th century example of terrible actions by Democrats in power. Just like in the last week with the new president and his admin that is in good part a reconstruction of the Obama regime. Previous incompetents such a John Kerry and Susan Rice were given broad powers by Joseph Robinette Biden Jr.

  6. If you’re gonna speak a language other than English pls translate.

  7. Much like the internment of Japanese Americans, I agree that FDR made a terrible decision in not permitting the entry of Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi persecution.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/museums/holocaust-museum-rethinks-fdrs-world-war-ii-refugee-legacy/2018/04/20/b5fc96fa-369b-11e8-acd5-35eac230e514_story.html

    To my mind, the bombing of Auschwitz is more equivocal.

    Bombing the camp likely kills many you are trying to save.

    Bombing the railways (which can easily be repaired, by inmates themselves) would likely have to continue unabated (thereby jeopardizing bomber crews) to have any substantial impact.

    (Would you bomb during the day while inmates are attempting repairs ? How effective would nighttime bombing be ?)

    Either takes assets away from crucial military targets.

    And the question remains: what is the net positive effect of doing either or both ?

    To my mind, the moral imperative seems clear, yet the practical effect is not so clear.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auschwitz_bombing_debate

  8. Let’s read the review cited by Fort Drum MP, shall we ?

    “Arthur Butz has cogently and meticulously torn to tatters the audacious lie that is the holocaust. Any honest and objective person who believes in the holocaust that reads this book will emerge with a world view that has been literally deconstructed. It is that persuasive.

    “Here are just a few well documented facts that have been kept from us for over sixty years.

    1. The Germans who were prosecuted for gassings during the trials at Nuremberg had their confessions extracted by torture.

    2. Not one piece of verifiable physical evidence for the supposed gassing of anyone has ever been produced (no functional gas chamber, not one autopsied body that died of cyanide poisoning, no corroborating German documents, you name it).

    3. The pictures of naked dead bodies being bulldozed into mass graves, seered into your brain since you were a child, died of a massive typhus epidemic. They weren’t gassed.

    “Once you realize the terrible and far reaching implications of this massive lie (media and academia that are utterly controlled by the criminal state of Israel, the JFK assassination and coup d’état, The false flag mass murders of 9/11 and subsequent illegal wars, etc.) you find yourself in an uncomfortable position. You will either become a dissident or a coward. I therefore advise that you proceed with caution.”

    Enough said.

    By the way, Professor Butz’s book is no longer available on Amazon (or, I suspect, through any other reputable merchant).

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