Senate Republicans List New State Laws – 21

A listing of all new laws scheduled to go into effect on January 1, continues.

Not all measures approved by the General Assembly go into effect on the first of the year. Bills which contain a specific effective date within the language of the measure and bills that carry an “immediate” effective date can go into effect at other times of the year.

The State Senate meets on the third floor of the north side of the Illinois State Capitol.

However, January 1 is the default date for a new law to become effective if there is no specific language specifying when it will become effective.

Under the Illinois Constitution, the legislature must set a “uniform effective date” for laws passed prior to June 1 of a calendar year. That uniform effective date, which is January 1, applies if the legislation does not otherwise specify when the law becomes effective.

A listing of all new laws scheduled to go into effect on January 1, follows.

Not all measures approved by the General Assembly go into effect on the first of the year. Bills which contain a specific effective date within the language of the measure and bills that carry an “immediate” effective date can go into effect at other times of the year.

However, January 1 is the default date for a new law to become effective if there is no specific language specifying when it will become effective.

Under the Illinois Constitution, the legislature must set a “uniform effective date” for laws passed prior to June 1 of a calendar year. That uniform effective date, which is January 1, applies if the legislation does not otherwise specify when the law becomes effective.

Local Government

Ambulance Service Funds (HB 438/PA 98-0199): Allows counties with a  population between 8,400-9,000 to use funds that come from an ambulance service levy for 911 services if voters
approve this use through referendum.  Hamilton County currently levies an ambulance tax, but does not provide a countywide ambulance service and would like to use the funds for 911 services.

McHenry County College

The possibility that the McHenry County College Board might issue non-referendum bonds to finance a huge addition stimulated State Rep. David McSweeney to introduce House Bill 983.

Local Bonds (HB 983/PA 98-0203): This bill would make it easier access for taxpayers to seek backdoor referendums in cases where local governments wish to propose alternative or “double-barreled” bonds.  The bill would apply to local governments with less than 500,000 in population. A referendum would be required if sought by 7.5% of registered voters or 200 registered voters, whichever is less. Extends the time allotted for taxpayers to secure a backdoor referendum from 30 days to 45 days.

CMS Date Collection (SB 1670/PA 98-0283): Would require Central Management Services (CMS) to distribute a spreadsheet to each State agency to facilitate the collection of data on the State’s annual workforce characteristics, workforce compensation, and employee mobility. CMS would be required to annually make the data received from each State agency available on the Illinois Transparency and Accountability Portal (ITAP) or another open data site.

Errors by Tax Collectors, Due Dates (SB 1737/PA 98-0286): Requires that if a county collector sends a separate bill for the arrearages of taxes due, as a result of an administrative error on the part of the county, the bill may be due no sooner than 30 days after the due date for the next installment of taxes.

Local Government Investment (SB 1950/PA 98-0297): This is a proposal of the Illinois Metropolitan Investment Fund (IMET), which pools money from local governments and invests them in investments permitted under statute.  This would allow IMET to buy local and state government bonds for its pooled investment fund for all types of local governments (currently, just municipalities and counties).

Water Infrastructure (SB 1869/PA 98-0330): Updates language in the state’s Municipal Code to allow cities and villages to construct, and maintain storm sewers, detention basins and retention basins (currently drains, ditches, levees, dykes, pumping works, and machinery).  An amendment allows construction of “green infrastructure” including green roofs, rain gardens, bioswales, tree boxes, porous pavement, porous pipe systems, native plantings, constructed wetlands, and cisterns.  Cities and villages may also acquire land to manage runoff by infiltration, evapotranspiration, or collection.

Sanitary District Appointments (HB 2239/PA 98-0407): Amends the Sanitary District Act of 1917. In the event that an appropriate appointing authority fails to appoint a trustee, the appointing authority will reconvene and appoint a successor on or before July 1 of that year.

Municipal Finance (SB 2339/PA 98-0504):  Designed to protect municipalities that utilize joint insurance pools. The measure requires joint insurance pools to annually file a certification with the Director of Insurance by an independent actuary, guaranteeing that the pool’s reserves are in accordance with sound loss-reserving standards and are adequate for the payment of claims.  Grants the Director of Insurance expanded regulatory oversight of joint self-insurance pools and requires.

Pensions and Retirement Benefits

Roth IRA (SB 1534/ PA 98-0491): Allows state employees with a deferred compensation plan to also participate in Roth IRA plans. The bill also instructs the Department of Central Management Services and local governments to allow designated Roth IRA contributions and in-plan rollovers to designated Roth accounts.


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